Director:
Paul Tesar, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor

Department of Genetics
School of Medicine
Case Western Reserve University
Paul Tesar graduated with a B.S. in biology from Case Western Reserve University and went on to earn his Ph.D. from the University of Oxford as a recipient of the prestigious NIH-Oxford Biomedical Research Scholarship. He then continued his training as a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke at the National Institutes of Health. His graduate and postdoctoral studies, under the tutelage of Professor Sir Richard Gardner and Dr. Ron McKay, focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms and therapeutic potential pluripotent stem cells which led to his discovery of epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). Paul has received numerous scientific awards including the Harold M. Weintraub Award of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the Beddington Medal of the British Society for Developmental Biology.
Paul, a Cleveland native, returned home in 2009 and joined the Case Western Reserve School of Medicine as a faculty member in the Department of Genetics where he is continuing his studies on the use of both adult and embryonic stem cells to understand and treat human disease. Paul is a member of the Center for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine and serves as co-directory of the Pluripotent Stem Cell Facility. He also maintains an adjunct appointment in the Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at the Lerner Research Institute of the Cleveland Clinic.
Director:
Horst von Recum, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor

Department of Biomedical Engineering
Case Western Reserve University
The research in our laboratory focuses on novel platforms for the delivery of molecules and cells. In the molecular delivery projects we are examining novel degradable polymer platforms for delivery of therapeutic agents for HIV therapies, wound dressings, ocular disease and localized chemotherapy. We are also investigating the use of novel stimulirespnsive polymers for use in gene, and drug delivery. These polymers can allow binding and loading under one condition, and release or expression under another condition. The cellular delivery projects are examining using directed differentiation to produce tissue engineered constructs from stem cell sources. Stem cells show great promise as a therapeutic tool due to there unlimited replication potential and their plasticity, or capacity to become many different cell types. Better control of differentiation and selection, will allow for rapid expansion of high purity differentiated cells suitable for tissue engineering, toxicology and pharmacology, as well as cellular modeling, without the need for isolating cells from primary sources.
PSCF Manager:
Leslie Cooperman
Research Assistant

Department of Genetics
School of Medicine
Case Western Reserve University